How To Combine Vintage Style And Modern Fashion

There’s something to be said about a woman who has her own unique sense of style. This type of woman is especially muse-worthy because she doesn’t necessarily pay attention to what the biggest celebrities are wearing or what the hottest trends are. She doesn’t let others’ opinions sway her fashion decisions. She loves to create new looks and doesn’t stick her nose up at a garment based on the brand.

Instead, she knows that fashion is a form of self-expression and that you can’t express yourself simply by being a copy of someone else. And in order to make your style a reflection of who you are, you’ve got to represent all parts of you. In the case of a Hipsterette, it’s all about taking inspiration from the past and adapting to the trends of the present. Vintage clothing has so many endearing qualities, cuts, and motifs that contemporary style just shouldn’t have to live without!

While bringing antique apparel into the modern world is a fun fashion decision, it can be surprisingly difficult to mix and match the two time periods to create one cute, cohesive look. That’s why it helps to have a few tips to refer to, whether it’s your first or 50th time trying out this specific type of look.

vintage_01

Here are some helpful ideas for combining vintage style with modern fashion:

Choose your battles

Finding a sweet spot that exists between two completely different looks requires a certain amount of balance. And, surprisingly, when it comes to fashion and interior design, a lot of the principles are interchangeable. For example, this article on She Knows is about mixing the past and present in terms of decor, but the tips are just as useful when applying them to clothing. The piece says that “creating balance is critical”, and to do so, you should remember contrast. If your main piece is overtly vintage, remember to mix in modern jewellery. If your clothes are contemporary style, add an old-fashioned hat to off-set the look.

Remember colour

The colour wheel is very difficult to master. There is much more to be aware of than just the simple primary colours. This breakdown on The Style Note does a fantastic job of describing the different ways that certain tones, shades, and hues can and should be combined in fashion. It’s important to take notes of these different properties because when you’re dealing with clothing from two different time periods, a lot of the popular dyes are not the same. But once you have an eye for warm colours, for example, you’ll have an easier time piecing together similar shades of clothing, no matter their age.

Shape and silhouette are important

Last but not least, you should always pay attention to the particular style each garment possesses. If you’re looking at a ’50s-style dress, for instance, it’s likely to have a full skirt and tea length, which definitely carries a timestamp. So to balance out the tell-tale silhouette, bring a modern top into the mix, like one that’s grungy and fitted. Juxtaposing the two opposites makes your outfit one-of-a-kind and totally covet-worthy. Since it takes a bit of extra confidence to take fashion risks like these, looking through the articles on Lyst can be helpful as they don’t hold back when it comes to style! You can find street style photos, guides to certain looks, and other helpful tips.

With these tips to help you out, here’s hoping you’re one step closer to your goal of mixing modern and vintage!

 

2 Comments on How To Combine Vintage Style And Modern Fashion

  1. Allan Gardiner
    January 8, 2016 at 9:04 am (1 year ago)

    Very well written, Inez!

    Reply
  2. Juliet
    January 13, 2016 at 5:14 pm (1 year ago)

    Can I like this x 100? 🙂 So well said Inese – I can’t get over how many times the buzzwords like ‘must-have’ and ‘trending’ are talked about at fashion shows or events – make me cringe every single time. Some good thoughts here!
    Stay classy x
    Juliet
    @Lacenruffles

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment *